Sleeping Beauty

Read and listen this interesting short story to check your reading skills.

Sleeping Beauty

Once upon a time, in the days when there were fairies, a king and queen reigned in a country far away. Now this king and queen had plenty of money, plenty of fine clothes to wear, plenty of good things to eat and drink and a coach to ride out in every day. However, although they had been married many years, they had no children. This saddened them very much, as they dearly wanted a child.

One day, as the queen was walking by the side of the river at the bottom of the garden, she saw a poor little fish that had thrown itself out of the water and lay gasping and nearly dead on the bank. The queen took pity on the little fish and threw it back again into the river. Before it swam away, it raised its head out of the water and said “I know what your wish is and it shall come true, in return for your kindness to me — you will soon have a daughter.”

KIng and queen smiling at new baby girl. Background the queen is putting fish into water.

What the little fish had said soon happened and the queen had a little girl, so very beautiful, that the king could not stop looking at her he was so happy. He said he would throw a great party and show the child to all the land, so he asked his kinsmen, nobles, friends, and neighbours. But the queen said “I will have the fairies also, that they might be kind and good to our little daughter.”

Now there were thirteen fairies in the kingdom, but as the king and queen had only twelve golden dishes for them to eat out of, they were forced to leave one of the fairies without asking her. So twelve fairies came, each with a high red cap on her head, red shoes with high heels on her feet and a long white wand in her hand. After the feast was over they gathered round in a ring and gave all their best gifts to the little princess. One gave her goodness, another beauty, another riches, and so on till she had all that was good in the world.

Just as eleven of them had done blessing her, a great noise was heard in the courtyard and word was brought that the thirteenth fairy had come, with a black cap on her head, black shoes on her feet and a broomstick in her hand. She quickly came up into the dining-hall. Now, as she had not been asked to the feast she was very angry, scolded the king and queen very much and set to work to take her revenge. So she cried out “The king’s daughter shall, in her fifteenth year, be wounded by a spindle, and fall down dead.”

Disgruntled fairy dressed in black casts spell on Sleeping Beauty who is lying in cot. Anguished king and queen in background with other good fairies.

Then the twelfth of the friendly fairies, who had not yet given her gift, came forward, and said that the evil wish must be fulfilled, but that she could soften its mischief; so her gift was, that the king’s daughter, when the spindle wounded her, should not really die, but should only fall asleep for a hundred years. Continue reading

Advertisements

Modal verb CAN

Can

“Can” is one of the most commonly used modal verbs in English. It can be used to express ability or opportunity, to request or offer permission, and to show possibility or impossibility.

Examples:

  • I can ride a horse. ability
  • We can stay with my brother when we are in Paris. opportunity
  • She cannot stay out after 10 PM. permission
  • Can you hand me the stapler? request
  • Any child can grow up to be president. possibility

Using “Can” in Present, Past, and Future

Most modal verbs behave quite irregularly in the past and the future. Study the chart below to learn how “can” behaves in different contexts.

Modal Use Positive Forms
1. = Present2. = Past

3. = Future

Negative Forms
1. = Present2. = Past

3. = Future

Also use:
can
general ability
1. I can speak Chinese.

2. SHIFT TO “COULD”
I could speak Chinese when I was a kid.

3. SHIFT TO “BE ABLE TO”
I will be able to speak Chinese by the time I finish my course.

1. I can’t speak Swahili.

2. SHIFT TO “COULD”
I couldn’t speak Swahili.

3. SHIFT TO “BE ABLE TO”
I won’t be able to speak Swahili.

be able to
can
ability during a specific event
1. With a burst of adrenaline, people can pick up cars.

2. SHIFT TO “BE ABLE TO”
With a sudden burst of adrenaline, he was able to lift the car off the child’s leg.

3. SHIFT TO “BE ABLE TO”
With a sudden burst of adrenaline, he will be able to lift the car.

1. Even with a burst of adrenaline, people can’t pick up something that heavy.

2. SHIFT TO “BE ABLE TO”
Even the weight lifter, wasn’t able to lift the car off the child’s leg.

3. SHIFT TO “BE ABLE TO”
Even three men working together won’t be able to lift the car.

be able to
can
opportunity
1. I have some free time. I can help her now.

2. SHIFT TO “BE ABLE TO”
I had some free time yesterday. I was able to help her at that time.

3. I’ll have some free time tomorrow. I can help her then.

1. I don’t have any time. I can’t help her  now.

2. SHIFT TO “BE ABLE TO”
I didn’t have time yesterday. I wasn’t able to help her at that time.

3. I won’t have any time later. I can’t help her then.

be able to
can
permission
1. I can drive Susan’s car when she is out of town.

2. SHIFT TO “BE ALLOWED TO ”
I was allowed to drive Susan’s car while she was out of town last week.

3. I can drive Susan’s car while she is out of town next week.

1. I can’t drive Susan’s car when she is out of town.

2. SHIFT TO “BE ALLOWED TO ”
I wasn’t allowed to drive Susan’s car while she was out of town last week.

3. I can’t drive Susan’s car while she is out of town next week.

may
can
request
Can I have a glass of water?Can you give me a lift to school?

Requests usually refer to the near future.

Can’t I have a glass of water?Can’t you give me a lift to school?

Requests usually refer to the near future.

could, may
can
possibility, impossibility
Anyone can become rich and famous if they know the right people.Learning a language can be a real challenge.

This use is usually a generalization or a supposition.

It can’t cost more than a dollar or two.You can’t be 45! I thought you were about 18 years old.

This use is usually a generalization or a supposition.

could

Challenge your English skills!

Play very interesting games and upgrade your knowledge.

Task

Here in this game you will have 10 steps to complete the game.

You have to type in CAN or CAN’T.

Good luck with the English test.

Wild animals-modal verb CAN

can and could

Learn through games!

Go to top

Animals + Verbs (listen and write the word/phrase)

Listening and writing skills!

Challenge your English skills!

Play very interesting games and upgrade your knowledge.

Task

Go to top

Healthy or Junk Food

Healthy Food #1: Lemons

Why They’re Healthy:

— Just one lemon has more than 100 percent of your daily intake of vitamin C, which may help increase “good” HDL cholesterol levels and strengthen bones.

— Citrus flavonoids found in lemons may help inhibit the growth of cancer cells and act as an anti-inflammatory.

Quick Tip:

Add a slice of lemon to your green tea. One study found that citrus increases your body’s ability to absorb the antioxidants in the tea by about 80 percent.

Healthy Food #2: Broccoli

Why It’s Healthy:

— One medium stalk of broccoli contains more than 100 percent of your daily vitamin K requirement and almost 200 percent of your recommended daily dose of vitamin C — two essential bone-building nutrients.

— The same serving also helps stave off numerous cancers.

Quick Tip:

Zap it! Preserve up to 90 percent of broccoli’s vitamin C by microwaving. (Steaming or boiling holds on to just 66 percent of the nutrient.)

Healthy Food #3: Dark Chocolate

Why It’s Healthy:

— Just one-fourth of an ounce daily can reduce blood pressure in otherwise healthy individuals.

— Cocoa powder is rich in flavonoids, antioxidants shown to reduce “bad” LDL cholesterol and increase “good” HDL levels.

Quick Tip:

A dark chocolate bar contains about 53.5 milligrams of flavonoids; a milk chocolate bar has fewer than 14.

Healthy Food #4: Potatoes

Why They’re Healthy:

— One red potato contains 66 micrograms of cell-building folate — about the same amount found in one cup of spinach or broccoli.

— One sweet potato has almost eight times the amount of cancer-fighting and immune-boosting vitamin A you need daily.

Quick Tip:

Let your potato cool before eating. Research shows that doing so can help you burn close to 25 percent more fat after a meal, thanks to a fat-resistant starch.

Healthy Food #5: Salmon

Why It’s Healthy:

— A great source of omega-3 fatty acids, which have been linked to a reduced risk of depression, heart disease, and cancer.

— A 3-ounce serving contains almost 50 percent of your daily dose of niacin, which may protect against Alzheimer’s disease and memory loss.

Quick Tip:

Opt for wild over farm-raised, which contains 16 times as much toxic polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) as wild salmon.
Continue reading

Adjectives: Comparative and Superlative Degree

COMPARATIVE ADJECTIVES

Comparative adjectives are used to compare differences between the two objects they modify (larger, smaller, faster, higher). They are used in sentences where two nouns are compared, in this pattern:

Noun (subject) + verb + comparative adjective + than + noun (object).

The second item of comparison can be omitted if it is clear from the context (final example below).

EXAMPLES
  • My house is larger than hers.
  • This box is smaller than the one I lost.
  • Your dog runs faster than Jim’s dog.
  • The rock flew higher than the roof.
  • Jim and Jack are both my friends, but I like Jack better. (“than Jim” is understood)

SUPERLATIVE ADJECTIVES

Superlative adjectives are used to describe an object which is at the upper or lower limit of a quality (the tallest, the smallest, the fastest, the highest). They are used in sentences where a subject is compared to a group of objects.

Noun (subject) + verb + the + superlative adjective + noun (object).

The group that is being compared with can be omitted if it is clear from the context (final example below).

EXAMPLES
  • My house is the largest one in our neighborhood.
  • This is the smallest box I’ve ever seen.
  • Your dog ran the fastest of any dog in the race.
  • We all threw our rocks at the same time. My rock flew the highest. (“of all the rocks” is understood)

FORMING REGULAR COMPARATIVES AND SUPERLATIVES

Forming comparatives and superlatives is easy. The form depends on the number of syllables in the original adjective.

ONE SYLLABLE ADJECTIVES

Add -er for the comparative and -est for the superlative. If the adjective has a consonant + single vowel + consonant spelling, the final consonant must be doubled before adding the ending.

Adjective Comparative Superlative
tall taller tallest
fat fatter fattest
big bigger biggest
sad sadder saddest
TWO SYLLABLES

Adjectives with two syllables can form the comparative either by adding -er or by preceeding the adjective with more. These adjectives form the superlative either by adding -est or by preceeding the adjective with most. In many cases, both forms are used, although one usage will be more common than the other. If you are not sure whether a two-syllable adjective can take a comparative or superlative ending, play it safe and use more and most instead. For adjectives ending in y, change the y to an i before adding the ending.

Adjective Comparative Superlative
happy happier happiest
simple simpler simplest
busy busier busiest
tilted more tilted most tilted
tangled more tangled most tangled

Continue reading

English Grammar Exercise – Beginner’s English

Grammar skills!

Challenge your English skills!

Play very interesting games and upgrade your knowledge.

Task

The 10 questions English Grammar Exercise for beginners is only for elementary level students and everyone who wants to test him/herself. Find out how good you are at basic English grammar with this multiple choice quiz. There is a gap in each sentence. Click on the correct option. There is only ONE correct answer for each question.

Good luck with the English test.

Continue reading

Present Simple vs Present Continuous

Challenge your English skills!

Play very interesting games and upgrade your knowledge.

Complete the sentences with correct form of the verb in suitable tense: Past Simple or Present Continuous.

‘I surf / I am surfing.’

What’s the difference between the Present Simple / Present Continuous and how to use them.

We use the present simple tense when we want to talk about fixed habits or routines – things that don’t change.

We use the present continuous to talk about actions which are happening at the present moment, but will soon finish.

Compare these two statements:

  • (present simple) I play tennis.
  • (present continuous/ progressive) I am playing tennis.

(present simple) ‘I play tennis’ tells us that playing tennis is something the speaker always does. It is part of a routine or habit. We can call this a permanent situation.

(present continuous/ progressive) ‘I am playing tennis’ tells us that the speaker is playing tennis right now. Soon the game will be over. We call this a temporary situation.

With the present simple we say:

I play tennis

You play tennis

We play tennis

They play tennis

He/she/ it plays tennis.

With the present continuous we say:

I am playing tennis

You are playing tennis

We are playing tennis

He/she/it is playing tennis

Frequency Adverbs we use with the Present Simple

With the present simple we use these frequency adverbs:

(Notice that the adverb comes before the main verb in the sentence.)

Always: ‘I always read before I go to bed.’

Often: ‘Her sister often comes shopping with us.’

Frequently:‘Michael frequently visits his family.’

Sometimes:‘You sometimes go to the gym, don’t you?’

Occasionally:‘It occasionally rains in summer.’

Seldom:‘They seldom ask for help.’

Rarely: ‘He rarely goes out without his backpack.’

Hardly ever:‘I hardly ever eat pizza.’

Never: ‘Japanese people never wear shoes inside.’ Continue reading

The music teacher! – Present Simple Tense

The present tense is the base form of the verb: I work in London.
But the third person (she/he/it) adds an -s: She works in London.

Use

We use the present tense to talk about:

  • something that is true in the present:

DJ Hardwell  is in Miami.
He is from Netherlands.
I‘m a DJ.

  • something that happens again and again in the present:

He plays music every day.

We use words like sometimes, often. always, and never (adverbs of frequency) with the present tense:

I sometimes go to the cinema.
She never plays football.

  • something that is always true:

The adult human body contains 206 bones.
Light travels at almost 300,000 kilometers per second.

  • something that is fixed in the future.

The school term starts next week.
The train leaves at 1945 this evening.
We fly to Paris next week.

Challenge your English skills!

Play very interesting games and upgrade your knowledge.

Fill in the empty fields with the correct form of the verb in Present Simple Tense.

The music teacher! – Present Simple Tense

English teaccher

Go to top

The Fairy Tulips Story

The Fairy Tulips Story

Make a story with QR codes

This story is about the most beautiful season of the year, Spring. In these parts of the story you will find details what this season of the years makes it so beautiful.

Instructions

Here you will find four different QR codes.
Each of them represents different parts of the story.
Scan the code with you smart phone and read the text.
After you have read all the parts make the order of the story.

All you have to do is to scan the QR code and to decide which part is it.

Make the story by its order!

QR codes Pictures
qr_code_1 tulips in the garden
qr_code_2 tulips and the moon

qr_code_3

tulips growing

qr_code_4

tulips bed